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Lecture on “Fine & Decorative Arts:  An Era of Transition?” by Leland Little

when: Apr. 10, 2014

The JLMH is proud to present a lecture on “Fine & Decorative Arts: An Era of Transition?” by Leland Little on Thursday, April 10, 2014 at 7 pm at the Visitors Center of the Joel Lane Museum House at 160 South Saint Mary’s Street, Raleigh, NC 27603. Admission will be $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the Joel Lane Historical Society. Refreshments will be served. Seating is limited, and advanced payment is required. Please call 919-833-3431 with your MasterCard or Visa, or mail a check to P O Box 10884, Raleigh NC 27605, or go to the Eventbrite web site by clicking on this link: Fine and Decorative Arts Tickets. Be sure to include the names of all in your party; nametags will serve as tickets. Tickets are non-refundable unless we must cancel the event.

The talk will provide a relevant discussion on current market trends and cultural change in what we value.

Leland J. Little, CAI, brings over twenty-five years of experience in the antiques, auction, and estate business to the Hillsborough, North Carolina based Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales, Ltd. As President and Principal Auctioneer, Mr. Little has guided the Gallery into one of the premier auction houses in the Southeast, holding quarterly catalogue auctions which gross over $1 million each sale. Mr. Little regularly conducts on-site estate sales throughout the Southeast and has led appraisal clinics and auctions for charities throughout North Carolina. Currently, Mr. Little serves on the advisory board for MESDA and is a board member of The Samaritan Health Center. He lives with his wife and two daughters in Durham, NC.


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What visitors say

Thank you so much for leading us on a guided tour of the Joel Lane House! I had no idea that the kitchen was separate from the main house, and how different the two are. I had always assumed that the most dangerous job for a slave was in the fields, but your expertise showed me that the kitchen (because of the heat and potential for fire) was actually the most dangerous for a slave woman…

Maggie