Visitor Information

Garden

Search

Past Events

Lecture on Slavery in Microcosm: Bertie County, NC

when: Feb. 16, 2012

LeRae Umfleet presented a very scholarly lecture on Slavery in Microcosm: Bertie County, NC, 1790-1810 on Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 7 pm in the Visitors Center at 160 South Saint Mary’s Street, Raleigh, NC 27603. Admission was $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the Joel Lane Historical Society. Refreshments were served. Seating was limited, and advanced payment was required. Guests called 919-833-3431 with MasterCard or Visa, or mailed a check to P O Box 10884, Raleigh NC 27605. They included the names of all in the party; nametags served as tickets. Tickets were non-refundable unless we canceled the event.

LeRae Umfleet came to the Research Branch of the Office of Archives and History in 2003 and since that time the completion of a report on the 1898 Wilmington Race Riot has been her primary focus. Prior to working for Archives and History, LeRae was employed as Curator at the Joel Lane Museum House, 1999-2003, and as Curator of Collections at Historic Hope Plantation, 1994-1999. LeRae has served on the Board of Directors for the North Carolina Museums Council, the Historic Stagville Foundation, the Raleigh Heritage Trail, and the Bertie County Arts Council. Originally from Bath, North Carolina, LeRae graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill in 1991 with a Bachelor’s Degree in History. She then attended the Archival Management Program at NC State and briefly worked in Archives Search Room (1991-1992) before transferring to East Carolina University where she graduated with a Master’s Degree in 1998. Reflecting her personal interest in plantation slavery, her Master’s thesis was entitled “Slavery in Microcosm: Bertie County, North Carolina 1790-1810”. LeRae is married to a great husband, Chris, and they have two children, Alex age 15 and Fletcher age 8.


previous
next
Back to Events Listing

What visitors say

Thank you so much for leading us on a guided tour of the Joel Lane House! I had no idea that the kitchen was separate from the main house, and how different the two are. I had always assumed that the most dangerous job for a slave was in the fields, but your expertise showed me that the kitchen (because of the heat and potential for fire) was actually the most dangerous for a slave woman…

Maggie