Visitor Information

Garden

Search

Past Events

Dedication Ceremony: Memorial to the Enslaved of the Joel Lane Plantation

when: Feb. 16, 2020

Time: Sunday, February 16, 2020, 2:00-2:30pm
Light refreshments will be served following the ceremony.

Location: Joel Lane Museum House Herb Garden, at the southeast corner of the JLMH grounds, located at 160 S. St. Mary’s St., Raleigh, NC 27603. Parking is available on the streets surrounding the museum.

Admission: Free; All are welcome.

Contact Information: tel: (919) 833-3431; email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

*******

Dedication Ceremony: Memorial to the Enslaved of the Joel Lane Plantation, 1769-1800

On Sunday, February 16, 2020, we will gather in the Joel Lane Museum House gardens for a time of contemplation and remembrance, as we dedicate a memorial to the people who were held in slavery by Joel Lane and his family. At least forty-three men, women, and children are known to have been enslaved on this plantation. This memorial will serve as a permanent testament to this community, who lived and labored here in bondage, and their essential place in our history. Please join us as we honor them.

The Joel Lane Museum House is forever grateful to Florence Mitchell, whose tireless research revealed so much of what we know about the enslaved community, and whose generous 2018 bequest made this memorial possible. Florence’s passion for understanding and teaching history inspires and supports our continuing work, every day.


previous
Dedication Ceremony: Memorial to the Enslaved of the Joel Lane Plantation
Dedication Ceremony: Memorial to the Enslaved of the Joel Lane Plantation
next
Back to Events Listing

What visitors say

Thank you so much for leading us on a guided tour of the Joel Lane House! I had no idea that the kitchen was separate from the main house, and how different the two are. I had always assumed that the most dangerous job for a slave was in the fields, but your expertise showed me that the kitchen (because of the heat and potential for fire) was actually the most dangerous for a slave woman…

Maggie